Leadership decision-making during a crisis
July 13, 2020  

Supplied by entelect2013 Administrator from entelect2013
Leadership roles and responsibilities have drastically changed and will most likely continue to do so. This section focuses on making decisions, remaining transparent, and facing challenges while having spontaneous conversations.

 

READ THE FULL LEADERSHIP GUIDELINES FOR WORKING REMOTELY PUBLICATION

Leadership roles and responsibilities have drastically changed and will most likely continue to do so. This section focuses on making decisions, remaining transparent, and facing challenges while having spontaneous conversations.

 

 

 

Decisions made quickly over decisions made with precision


•    Use the triangulation principle of getting input from the 2-3 most credible people, and taking the middle point of the agreement, as fast as possible. Roll these decisions out to the rest of the teams.
•    Waiting to decide is a decision itself and you should try to avoid unnecessary decision-making delays.
•    Own problems. Don’t waste time on trying to figure out who is ‘technically responsible’ for issues. Everyone in leadership should pick up and take ownership of whatever they can help with. Encourage this behaviour in your senior team.

 

Buy-in via transparency over buy-in via consultation


•    Employees will need assurance that leadership is being proactive and transparent.
•    The best way to get buy-in from people excluded from decision-making processes is to give frequent updates to your teams on decisions that are made.
•    Explain to those who are not involved why and how decisions are being made and agreements are reached.

 

Adapt towards opportunity over only mitigating risk


•    You suddenly have to make high-impact decisions that will have both short- and long-term consequences. Go with your gut.
•    Environments will change rapidly and so will the impact on your organisation. Set frequent checkpoints to review your plans and measures appropriately.
•    Understand your standard rulebook may need to change, even dramatically, to achieve the best results for your organisation. Challenge the entrenched mindset, strategy and tactics.

 

Spontaneous conversations over scheduled calls and meetings

 

Promote a flexible schedule and become interactive
•    Leadership gets into the habit of scheduling their days, weeks in a particular way. Scheduling needs to be more flexible to allow on-the-spot conversations.
•    Use the freed up time from having less meetings to reserve calendar time for these spontaneous conversations.
•    Be responsive and available by checking your channels regularly. Executives need to role-model this behaviour.
•    Schedules that previously relied on "corridor" or "desk time" for quick decisions now have to be replaced by calls or IM conversations for spontaneous input.


Individual decision-making is now more important than ever


•    Right now, the fastest way to save time in meetings is to make decisions yourself.
•    Don’t shy away from your responsibility to make a judgement call by hiding behind consensus.
•    Delegate authority and encourage independent thinking within a provided framework.

 

A decision-making scale


As importance of decision-making increases, fewer people, a single channel and more synchronous communication is required to make quicker decisions. Synchronous communication channels lend themselves better to spontaneous conversation.

 

 


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